Ah, the Amalfi Coast! Undeniably one of the most beautiful places in Italy, where mountains meet the sea in an explosion of colorful houses. In just a few hours you can go from the hustle-and-bustle of the Rome or Naples to Positano, or one of the other UNESCO-listed villages that dot the Amalfi Coast. So how do you get there? We’ll take you through your options.

  1. Rome to Naples
  2. Rome to Amalfi Coast
  3. Naples to Amalfi Coast
  4. Naples to Positano

1- Rome to Naples

rome to naples

The first leg of any trip from Rome to the Amalfi Coast is travelling from Rome to Naples. Some people might want to take some time to see some of Naples’ 500 churches, so we’ll first get you to the City of Domes.

Your cheapest option is to take advantage of Italy’s relatively inexpensive rail system. You’ll need to head from Rome’s main train station, Roma Termini, to Naples’ central station, Napoli Centrale. Trenitalia has trains running from early morning until late at night, usually direct, and with a few options. You can opt for the more expensive Frecciargento high-speed train, which has first and second class compartments and bar service, or you can take the Regionale – local commuter trains which are inexpensive, but can get packed at peak times.

If you are planning to explore the surrounding area, you could always rent a car and drive to Naples, but you first have to make sure your driver’s license is valid in Italy, and then you have to worry about finding parking in the city, and the traffic if you’re not used to urban driving. Fortunately, the drive itself is quite simple: take the A1 Autostrada, which is a toll road, down to Naples. That’s it!

However, when it comes to convenience, nothing beats a car service like Daytrip. You can just sit back and relax as you’re brought door-to-door. On top of that, Daytrip offers the option to take sightseeing side-trips, so you can swing by Royal Palace of Caserta, or several other sites, while travelling from Rome to Naples.

2- Rome to the Amalfi Coast

Rome to the Amalfi Coast

After you’ve reached Naples (see above), things start to get a little more complicated. Because the Amalfi Coast is fairly long, there are actually two routes you can take, depending on your destination.

Again, the most economical option is to take public transport, but this can get quite crowded during rush hour or holidays, and there aren’t any direct routes from Naples to the Amalfi Coast, meaning you’ll need to transfer, and lug your luggage around with you.

If you’re heading to Positano, or towns on the western side, it’s best to take the train from Naples to Sorrento, which, unfortunately, can only be booked in person. From Sorrento, you can take a bus to Positano (again, no online booking), or one of the nearby towns. Fortunately, Sorrento itself is beautiful, so you can fill any delays with stunning ocean views and fresh seafood to get a taste of the Amalfi Coast.

If you want to go to Amalfi, or one of the more eastern towns, take the train from Naples to Salerno, and then take a bus. During the summer, it’s also possible to take a ferry from Salerno to Amalfi, Minori, and Positano, but these can be weather-dependant.

If you’ve decided to drive from Rome, or are renting a car in Naples, this next leg is where things can get tricky, since you’ll be navigating the Amalfi Coast’s narrow, winding roads, and then weaving through village streets. And as usual, parking can be a problem.

To drive from Naples to the Amalfi Coast, get on the A3, and then take the route below to your destination:
To Sorrento, exit at Castellammare di Stabia, and take the SP 145. The simply follow the aptly named follow Via Sorrentina along the coast.
To Positano, head toward Sorrento, and then take the SS 163 (Via Nastro Azzurro).
To Amalfi, or other nearby villages, take the A3 down to Vietri Sul Mare, and then take the SS 163, Via Costeira, toward Amalfi.

If you’re after convenience, a car service like Daytrip is always your best bet. You can bypass Naples completely, and let the local drivers navigate the narrow roads, plus you won’t have to worry about parking. If you ever wanted to see the UNESCO World Heritage Sites of Pompeii and Herculaneum, or Mount Vesuvius, we’re happy to take a detour!

3- Naples to the Amalfi Coast

Naples to the Amalfi Coast

The Amalfi Coast is part of a large nature reserve, so the route you take from Naples depends on your final destination.

Your cheapest option is still going to be public transport, but there aren’t any direct routes from Naples to the Amalfi Coast, so you need to transfer. Also, during rush hour, holidays, or the high tourist season things can get quite crowded.

If you’re heading to Amalfi, or one of the more eastern towns, take the train from Naples to Salerno, and then take a bus. During the summer, it’s also possible to take a ferry from Salerno to Amalfi, Minori, and Positano, but these can be weather-dependant.

For villages to the West, you can take a train from Naples to Sorrento, but you can only buy these in person at the train station. Once in Sorrento, you hop a bus to your fishing village of choice. Don’t fret if you need to kill some time waiting for the bus – Sorrento is essentially an Amalfi Coast city, and offers stupendous views, quite a few landmarks, and exceptional food.

If you’re heading to one of the smaller villages, or want to do some exploring, you can drive from Naples to the Amalfi Coast, be beware the narrow roads and lack of parking.

From Naples, you first get on the A3. After that, your route depends on your destination:
To Sorrento, exit at Castellammare di Stabia, and take the SP 145. The simply follow the aptly named follow Via Sorrentina along the coast.
To Positano, head toward Sorrento, and then take the SS 163 (Via Nastro Azzurro).
To Amalfi, or other nearby villages, take the A3 down to Vietri Sul Mare, and then take the SS 163, Via Costeira, toward Amalfi.

If you’d like to sit back and let a local driver navigate Amalfi’s narrow roads, and bring you right to your accommodation, you want a car service like Daytrip. Plus you do some extra sightseeing on the way!

4- Naples to Positano

naples to positano

There isn’t a direct route from Naples to Positano on public transport, and what’s worse is that you can’t book tickets in advance for the public transport options. But if you feel like risking a crowded or sold-out train, it’s at least pretty straight forward. Take the train from Naples to Sorrento, and then hop on a bus to Positano.

If you’re confident in your driving abilities and have rented a car, get on the A3 from Naples, and take the Castellammare di Stabia exit. Continue on SS145 until you reach the SS 163, Via Nastro Azzurro, and follow this to Positano.

With no direct train route and precipitous roads, many people prefer a car service like Daytrip to get them from Naples to Positano. You’ll be picked up at the Naples train station, or in front of your accommodation, and brought right to the front-door of where you’re staying in Positano. And of course, with Daytrip’s sightseeing option you can experience even more of Italy!

 

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